Category Archives: Laboratory medicine

Laboratory medicine

Cholesterol and atherosclerosis deception

Worried about your cholesterol?  Ravnskov et al. say, don’t be. They allege decades of misleading statistics and selective reviews to sustain the hypothesis that high cholesterol is the major cause of CVD. 9. Conclusion The idea that high cholesterol levels … Continue reading

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Hundreds more medical reversals. But not ISO accreditation

Herrera-Perez et al reviewed over 3000 randomized controlled clinical trials in leading medical journals.  They found 396 reversals of practice were indicated. While medical leaders increasingly put their trust in ISO 15189 and ISO 17025 there remains a lack of evidence … Continue reading

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Risk-based thinking – it’s risky not to understand the mathematics of risk (and randomness)

Dr Melvyn Langford explains how the US Department of Defense (DoD) invented the 5×5 risk matrix in the 1980s. The methodology uses ordinal numbers (which are only for ranking) as if they are suitable for calculations.  It is misleading, meaningless and … Continue reading

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UKAS always doubted the “confidence” it sells

BSI sells ISO standards like ISO 17025 and 15189, designed to be vague enough to sell to vast numbers of the gullible. UKAS fills in the blanks, gratis, with documents like LAB 1.  These give the specifics in considerable detail. UKAS’s … Continue reading

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UKAS now “a partner to Government”

In a BMTA interview with retired chief executive of UKAS, Paul Stennett MBE, we learn, What is most satisfying is that UKAS is now seen as being a partner to Government, helping to deliver their regulatory agenda and in many cases … Continue reading

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Statistical pitfalls of accreditation

While doctors who experience UKAS assessments are becoming increasingly cynical about them, few have yet called out accreditation and stopped it. Stephen Senn’s comment in Nature, Statistical pitfalls of personalized medicine.  Misleading terminology and arbitrary divisions stymie drug trials and can … Continue reading

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CQC inspections have “little measurable impact” on services, analysis finds

The BMJ has reported a lack of evidence that the inspection regime of the Care Quality Commission improves services. Can we now expect similar scrutiny of UKAS’s inspections of pathology services? We might predict that those employed in the lab … Continue reading

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The most common nonconformities encountered during the assessments of medical laboratories in Hong Kong using ISO 15189 as accreditation criteria

This paper by Ho and Ho preceded that of Wilson et al. which examined ISO 17025 and was missed by these authors.  It used a similar approach to investigating the nature and number of ISO 15189 non-conformances over time. There were … Continue reading

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Margaret McCartney: A summary of four and a half years of columns in one column

Nothing to do with accreditation, just the poor thinking that lies behind it.  Dr McCartney is critical of inappropriate screening.  ISO accreditation is certainly that.  Some of her points most relevant to accreditation are below.  Click through to the BMJ to … Continue reading

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Three rules of groupthink: as global warming, so ISO accreditationism

Christopher Booker discovered Irving Janis’s Victims of Groupthink.  He used it as a framework for his report Global Warming: A Case Study in Groupthink.  We reported James Delingpole’s summary earlier. Here are Irving’s three rule of groupthink, useful because they … Continue reading

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