Monthly Archives: May 2011

Boy unable to wear blazer due to broken arm kicked out of class during Ofsted inspection ‘for not wearing correct uniform’

Inspections promote paranoia and over-reaction unless they are conducted with some pragmatism.  This is arguably impossible for inspections checking compliance with immutable rules.  It is the fault of the ISO system, although potentially it may be moderated by a sensible inspector.  A … Continue reading

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Mythbuster busted

The TUC All Together Campaign Mythbuster doesn’t start well: “Myth:  “Government debt is the highest it has ever been. The UK’s debt has been much higher in the past, and it is lower now than it was during most years of … Continue reading

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Bureaucrat bullies

The institutionalisation of madness is increasingly commonplace: “”Madness,” in both popular usage and in its now outmoded professional sense, is characterised by beliefs that are out of touch with reality or contrary to evidence, that are associated with negative emotions and unhelpful behaviours, and … Continue reading

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Opening up data at the European Medicines Agency

Professor Peter Gøtzsche and Anders Jørgensen have reported on the problems they encountered obtaining data from the European Medicines Agency. The reason? Doctors cannot choose the best treatments for their patients despite the existence of hundreds of thousands of randomised trials. … Continue reading

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An imposed factitious disorder

The presumption of professional incompetence is central to accreditation.  Likewise, it is at the heart of government policy regarding professions outside the Civil Service, politicians and banksters. It is driven in part by the desire of regulators to be seen to be Doing Something to control … Continue reading

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Management is going backwards

Simon Caulkin has written in Pity the NHS, managed by charlatans and flat-earthers: “Economist John Kay once remarked that in terms of scientific knowledge, management is about where medicine was in the mid-19th century. The history of the NHS is a graphic … Continue reading

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Cochrane’s ladder

Archie Cochrane’s ladder of evidence.  It’s helpful viewpoint for evaluating whether a treatment is worthwhile, isn’t it?   Accreditation is a treatment that is supposed to create quality…whatever that is.  Like everything else, the accreditation philosophy rests on the base of … Continue reading

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Crime In Progress

Inspector Guilfoyle has written a long, referenced essay, aptly entitled Crime In Progress, the Impact Of Targets On Police Service Delivery.  Perhaps, he will further develop the crime aspect of the management culture he is criticising.  It is a crime against progress.  Is … Continue reading

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I am an inspector. Please buy accreditation.

Are scientists and doctors also vulnerable to scams like this? Citizens Gullible to Doctor Look-Alikes ISTANBUL (Reuters) Apr 27 2011 – Turkish police donned white coats and stethoscopes to disguise themselves as doctors, then knocked on people’s doors to see … Continue reading

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Retrospective

Accreditation: retrospective – just like economists.

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