Category Archives: Psychology

Psychology

Six Sigma Is Draining Employees’ Creativity

Should your organization decide that ISOs are inadequate and add Six Sigma, consider Andrew Smart’s explanation and click through to read more fully or to order his book: The single most important goal of the Six Sigma is to reduce varia­tion in … Continue reading

Posted in Management, Psychology | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

The self-made women who created the Myers-Briggs

Nature carries an interesting review of the Myers-Briggs nonsense.  Popularised by the OSS and carried forward by corporate America. Maybe one day the ISO accreditation racket will also be debunked. Click through… The self-made women who created the Myers–Briggs S. … Continue reading

Posted in Management, Psychology | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Three rules of groupthink: as global warming, so ISO accreditationism

Christopher Booker discovered Irving Janis’s Victims of Groupthink.  He used it as a framework for his report Global Warming: A Case Study in Groupthink.  We reported James Delingpole’s summary earlier. Here are Irving’s three rule of groupthink, useful because they … Continue reading

Posted in Cartel, Laboratory medicine, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Worldview goes shoogly

Scott Adams’ Dilbert understands the ISO scam, even if he doesn’t document the corruption and criminality as thoroughly as Oxebridge. Adams recognizes how another source of cognitive dissonance can work in a TV interviewer: And here’s the original: By the … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy, Politics, Psychology | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Comforts of mindless consistency – false hope

  Why did punters rush to enroll just after hearing the Transcendental brand of Meditation debunked? Robert Cialdini explains, “[The group spokesman] put it best: “Well, I wasn’t going to put down any money tonight because I’m really quite broke right … Continue reading

Posted in Management, Psychology | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Quality 2020: systems thinking -v- inspectionism

Quality 2020 is a new 10-year strategy for improving clinical care.  It grew out of Deming’s teachings.  Here are the plans. But the hospitals are also pursuing UKAS accreditation to ISO 15189 and 17025.  Which is the opposite of systems thinking – … Continue reading

Posted in Management, Medicine, NHS, Psychology | Tagged , | 1 Comment

The End of Average: How to Succeed in a World That Values Sameness

Another argument against the standardised assessment of humans.  The authors deal with Taylorism but not ISOism, which has not yet entered the decline it deserves.  Maybe there’ll be a sequel. The End of Average: How to Succeed in a World … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Management, Psychology, Science | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Overcoming the therapeutic illusion of accreditation

When you understand the therapeutic illusion that doctors and patients may fall into, you may understand why the same fallacies come to bear on accepting the accreditation illusion.  The NEJM explains: The Science of Choosing Wisely — Overcoming the Therapeutic Illusion … Continue reading

Posted in Laboratory medicine, Medicine, Psychology, Science | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Agnotology

We have previously pointed out how accreditation is sold like a toiletry – gain *confidence* by paying money to UKAS and wasting lots more on unnecessary things that they might chance to inspect. Michael J. Hope Cawdery has drawn attention to the deception of … Continue reading

Posted in Bureaucracy, Cartel, Economics, History, Medicine, Philosophy, Psychology, Science | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Feeling Listless?

Theodore Dalrymple may not have suffered ISO accreditation but he has expressed insight into related managerialism through the demands for form-filling and list-making. His comments on checklists apply to all the ISO demands for inspection evidence and offer further explanation … Continue reading

Posted in Bureaucracy, Management, Medicine, Psychology | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment