The Myers-Briggs business model


What’s your personality type?  Wasteful?

Vox reports the Myers-Briggs personality test scam.  It parasitised Jung’s theories and likewise remains lacking in evidence.  Another bit of pseudoscientific management of resources that are human.   The personality test is more fun than its relative, ISO accreditation, but also causes a lot of misallocation of resources and misery when the ignorant rely on it.

They both live on into the 21st Century because a some people make a lot of money out of selling these job-ruining horoscopes-for-scientists.  It’s not just tax-payers’ money; industry loves the waste too.  And nobody asks for evidence.

Myersbriggstypes

The Myers-Briggs is useful for one thing: entertainment. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with taking the test as a fun, interesting activity, like a BuzzFeed quiz.

But there is something wrong with CPP peddling the test as “Reliable and valid, backed by ongoing global research and development investment.” The company makes an estimated $20 million annually, with the Myers-Briggs as its flagship product. Among other things, it charges between $15 and $40 to each person who wants to take the test, and $1,700 to each person who wants to become a certified test administrator.

Why would someone pay this much to administer a flawed test? Because once you have that title, you can sell your services as a career coach to both people looking for work and the thousands of major companies — such as McKinsey & Co., General Motors, and a reported 89 of the Fortune 100 — that use the test to separate employees and potential hires into “types” and assign them appropriate training programs and responsibilities. Once certified, test administrators become cheerleaders of the Myers-Briggs, ensuring that use of the outdated instrument is continued.

If private companies want to throw their money away on the Myers-Briggs, that’s their prerogative. But about 200 federal agencies reportedly waste money on the test too, including the State Department and the CIA. The military in particular relies heavily on the Myers-Briggs, and the EPA has given it to about a quarter of its 17,000 employees.

It’s 2014. Thousands of professional psychologists have evaluated the century-old Myers-Briggs, found it to be inaccurate and arbitrary, and devised better systems for evaluating personality. Let’s stop using this outdated measure — which has about as much scientific validity as your astrological sign — and move on to something else.

 

 

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