Myths, Presumptions, and Facts about Organisational Obesity


False and scientifically unsupported beliefs about accreditation are pervasive in both scientific literature and the cartel’s advertising.  The problem is less pervasive than obesity, but studies on obesity gives clues to how many facts are counterintuitive – at least if you’ve been listening to the propaganda too long. 

Myths, Presumptions, and Facts about Obesity

Krista Casazza, et al. N Engl J Med 2013; 368:446-454January 31, 2013DOI: 10.1056/NEJMsa1208051

Conclusions

False and scientifically unsupported beliefs about obesity are pervasive in both scientific literature and the popular press.

Accredited lean

If the myths summarised below have sustained without challenge, how much more might similar myths be true of inspectionism?  In fact, if you’re keeping up with the literature, you will know of forthcoming trials that involve carbohydrate and caloric restriction to improve cancer prevention and treatment outcomes.  What if severely limiting the glucose of inspection also decreased the uncontrolled growth of management idiocy and waste? 

The authors discuss a total of 7 myths, along with refuting evidence. Here are some examples:

The article also explores 6 “presumptions,” or widely accepted beliefs that are neither proven nor disproven. Among them:

Finally, the authors offer 9 facts about obesity and weight loss that are supported by data, among them:

According to Dr. Casazza and colleagues, “The myths and presumptions about obesity that we have discussed are just a sampling of the numerous unsupported beliefs held by many people, including academics, regulators, and journalists, as well as the general public. Yet there are facts about obesity of which we may be reasonably certain — facts that are useful today.”

And they conclude, “While we work to generate additional useful knowledge, we may in some cases justifiably move forward with hypothesized, but not proven, strategies. However, as a scientific community, we must always be open and honest with the public about the state of our knowledge and should rigorously evaluate unproved strategies.”

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Bureaucracy, Cartel, Laboratory medicine, Management, Medicine, NHS and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s